Vladimir I Sviatoslavich (Saint-Grand Duke) KIEV

Vladimir I Sviatoslavich (Saint-Grand Duke) KIEV

Characteristics

Type Value Date Place Sources
Name Vladimir I Sviatoslavich (Saint-Grand Duke) KIEV
Name Vladimir I "the Great" of KIEV
Name Vladimir I Swjatoslawitsch (Grand Duke) of KIEV
Name Vladimir RURIKOVICH
Occupation Grand Prince of Kiev point in time between 980 and 1015

Events

Type Date Place Sources
birth 958 Budyatychi, Ukraine search of this place
blessing Saint search of this place
death 15. July 1015 Berestove, Kiev, Ukraine search of this place
marriage about 980
marriage 988

Spouses and Children

Marriage Spouse Children
about 980
Rogneda (Princess) of POLOTSK
Marriage Spouse Children
988
Anna Porphyrogenita of BYZANTIUM
Marriage Spouse Children

Notes for this person

Vladimir (in Ukrainian, Volodymyr) I, Prince of Kiev, in German Valdimar, in Russian known as Saint Vladimir or as Vladimis the Great, (c.958-1015) in Old Ruthenian, Volodymer, was the illegitimate son of Sviatoslav I and the grandson of Olga of Kiev. Varangian ruler of Kiev from 980, he converted to Christianity in 988, reversing Sviatoslav's adherence to the pagan tradition (which was probably a mix of Norse and Slavic elements). Transferring his capital to Pereyaslavets in 969, Sviatoslav designated Vladimir ruler of Novgorod but gave Kiev to his legitimate son Yaropolk. After Sviatoslav's death (972), civil war erupted (976) between Yaropolk and his younger brother Oleg, ruler of Dereva. As he belonged to the Norse elite, Vladimir fled (977) to his kinsmen in Scandinavia, and Novgorod fell to Yaropolk. Returning in 978 with a large force of Viking warriors (see leidang), Vladimir recaptured Novgorod the following year. He slew the Varangian prince Ragnvald of Polotsk and married his daughter Ragnilda, who was engaged to Yaropolk. Yaropolk fled as Vladimir besieged Kiev, but was killed (980) after surrendering to Vladimir, who now ruled all his father's domains. Though Christianity had won many converts since Olga's rule, Vladimir had remained pagan, taking several wives and erecting pagan statues and shrines to gods, such as Thor and Odin. He continued his efforts to extend his territories, fighting in Galicia in 981, against the Yatvingians on the Baltic coast in 983, against the Bulgars in 985 and against the Byzantine Empire successfully in the Crimea in 987. In 988 he negotiated for the hand of the Byzantine emperor Basil II's sister, Anna. At Basil's insistence, Vladimir was baptized at Kherson, married Anna and gave up his other wives. Handing over Kherson to the Greeks, he destroyed pagan monuments and established many churches.Later, Vladimir sent ambassadors to Rome and other Christian capitals in the 11th century. Later, he helped to found Russian monasteries on Mt. Athos. Yaroslav, Vladimir's son by an earlier marriage, rebelled against him and refused to render him service or tribute for Novgorod. Vladimir prepared to take Novgorod by force, but died before the attack could begin. Eastern Catholic/Eastern Orthodox churches celebrate the feast day of the canonised Vladimir on 15 July. Kievan Rus was founded c.860 by Rurik, a Scandinavian Varangian. He founded the Rurikovich dynasty that would rule Russia for the next 800 years. Rurik's capital was the northern city of Novgorod, his successor Oleg relocated the capital to Kiev. While the early rulers of Rus were Scandinavians, they gradually merged with the local population and became Russians. Still, in the 11th century, Yaroslav, (called Jarisleif in Scandinavian chronicles) maintained the dynastic links and married a Swedish princess and gave asylum to king Olaf of Norway. The unity of Kievan Rus gradually declined, and was all but gone by 1132. After that period Kievan Rus shattered into a number of smaller states all of which contested for the throne of Kiev. Kievan Rus was finally destroyed by the Mongols in 1240, but the Rurikovich line persisted and ruled Moscow until the early seventeenth century. http://en.wikipedia.org

Database

Title Borneman-Wagner, Howard-Hause, Trout-Nutting, Boyer-Stutsman Family Tree
Description This is a work in progress, which likely contains numerous errors and omissions. Users are encouraged to verify any and all information which they wish to use.
Uploaded 2022-04-16 11:14:21.0
Submitter user's avatar William B.
email danke9@aol.com
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